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Guidelines on Positioning Your AED Cabinet: According to the American Disabilities Act (ADA)

AED cabinets can be a valuable asset to any automated external defibrillator (AED) program as they provide quick visibility, easy accessibility, and security for these lifesaving devices. However, it’s essential that you ensure the proper accessibility standards are met. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Guidelines are crucial to consider during installation to allow proper access to an AED for all individuals.  

The government established the ADA Guidelines to protect people with disabilities in many areas of public life. Following these guidelines can allow those who may be handicapped to have the same quick response time as any other rescuer during an emergency.  

Mounting Your AED Cabinet  

When mounting your AED cabinet, there are three options to consider: 

  • Protrusion Limit 
  • Surface Mount Cabinets 
  • Recessed Cabinets  

Objects, including AED cabinets, should not protrude more than 4 inches into walkways, corridors, passageways, or aisles if the bottom edge is between 27 and 80 inches above the finished floor. For surface mount cabinets exceeding the 4-inch protrusion limit, the bottom edge should be mounted no higher than 27 inches above the floor. An alternative solution is to use a recessed cabinet that does not extend beyond the 4-inch limit.   

 

Looking for a new AED cabinet? Shop here 

 

Handicapped Accessibility  

Facing Access  

If a person in a wheelchair can only access the cabinet by facing it, the handle should be positioned no higher than 48 inches above the ground. This ensures that individuals in wheelchairs can easily reach and operate the cabinet.

Side Access  

If a person in a wheelchair can approach the cabinet from the side, the handle should be positioned no higher than 54 inches above the floor. Creating side access will help accommodate individuals who can access the cabinet from different angles.  

 

Adhering to the ADA Accessibility Guidelines can help your AED cabinet be accessible to all individuals, creating a safer environment and community, especially when every second counts. If you have questions on AED cabinets, contact us today via our contact us form or email [email protected]! 

 

Related Article: How to be a Heart-Safe Environment 

 

Note: The information in this article is for educational purposes only and is not legal advice or all-encompassing requirements for ADA guidelines. For the most up-to-date guidelines regarding hanging an AED cabinet for accessibility, contact Heartsmart Inc. or view the ADA’s website. 

4 replies on “Guidelines on Positioning Your AED Cabinet: According to the American Disabilities Act (ADA)”

Can you advise whether there are any minimum height requirements for hanging. I’ve been unable to locate one in my researching.

Hi Elle! I would advise basing the height requirements on the Handicap Accessibility requirements which are as followed: Facing Access: If a person in a wheelchair can only access the cabinet by facing it, the handle should be positioned no higher than 48 inches above the ground. This ensures that individuals in wheelchairs can easily reach and operate the cabinet. Side Access: If a person in a wheelchair can approach the cabinet from the side, the handle should be positioned no higher than 54 inches above the floor. Creating side access will help accommodate individuals who can access the cabinet from different angles.

I hope this information is helpful! If you have any other questions or concerns, please email us at [email protected].

Can the AED be placed on a counter and if so how high should the counter be. We have 3 floors in our office, by law is it required to have one on each floor?

Thank you

Hi Angelica! Thank you for your questions! If you are placing the AED on a counter – I would recommend following the same height guidelines as the American Disabilities Act (ADA) recommends for cabinets. However, there is a downfall to having your AED sitting on a counter – it could be easily knocked over and damaged, stolen, or become dirty from dust, moisture, etc. We recommend all AEDs be placed in a cabinet or even a carrying case. In terms of the law regarding having an AED on each floor in your office space, you will have to check with your local state laws. Each state law is different – some base the number of AEDs in an office space on the amount of traffic that comes in and out of the office, while others differ. Please refer to your local state AED laws for further reference. A great AED Law resource that may help is AED.com’s AED Legislation resource found here: https://www.aed.com/aed-laws-and-requirements. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to our team at [email protected] with any more questions you may have!

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